c l i n i c a l f o l i o s : n a r r a t i v e





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Informed Patient's FAQ on Coronary Artery Disease: 13

A D V E R T I S E M E N T

   
 

What is angina? 

When the demand for oxygen increases, during exercise for example, and the narrowed coronary vessels restrict blood flow, pain fibers in the heart are stimulated. This pattern of crushing chest pain, often radiating to the left arm, is called angina pectoris.

If angina cannot be controlled with cardiac medications, a procedure called a balloon angioplasty may be successful in relieving it.     

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Informed Patient's FAQ on Coronary Artery Disease: 14

A D V E R T I S E M E N T

   
 

What is a balloon angioplasty? 

If the narrowing of the coronary artery is close to its origin at the aorta, the narrowing can sometimes be successfully widened with a balloon catheter in a procedure called a balloon angioplasty. The catheter is inserted through the skin into the main artery of the leg, and directed into the affected coronary artery using x-ray guidance. When the sausage-shaped balloon is inflated, it dilates the narrowing. The balloon is then deflated and removed.    

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Informed Patient's FAQ on Coronary Artery Disease: 15

A D V E R T I S E M E N T

   
 

What is coronary occlusion? 

When a coronary vessel becomes completely blocked, either by the fatty deposit itself or by a blood clot resulting from the slow-moving blood in the narrowed segment, this blockage is called a coronary occlusion.      

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This page was last modified on 6/3/1999.